AST
HISTORY 10 – World History
Mr. Alami

Course description
This course is an introduction to World History from the fall of Rome to the early 21st Century. The focus of the course content is to compare and contrast European, African, and East Asian civilizations in terms of their political, economic, military, social, and cultural histories. Race, gender, class, and geography are crucial elements considered throughout the course. In addition to the acquisition of a foundation of knowledge, student writing and primary source analysis are emphasized.

Objectives
After taking History 10, students should finish the year with a foundation of knowledge about the history of modern Europe, Africa, and Asia. They should have an appreciation for the past and an understanding of the contemporary world based on their study of the past. Above all, they should begin to recognize the complexity of history and empathize with people who are different from themselves. Students must learn important facts in order to understand and construct historical arguments; memorization and reasoning skills are both important. History 10 prepares students for upper-level History Department courses for advanced study. Thus, students learn how to be students: how to organize a notebook, how to take lecture notes, how to outline, how to read critically, how to analyze a document, how to study effectively and efficiently, how to research and write a term paper, and how to write intelligent essays based on supporting evidence. Most importantly, History 10 students must become self-disciplined and manage their time wisely. These skills are the key to a successful and rewarding academic experience at AST.

                                                                            Texts
Beck, Black, Krieger,Naylor & Shabaka. World History, Patterns of Interaction. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012.

Grading

Summative Assessment (45%)
-Projects, tests, papers, labs or presentations
Formative Assessment (40%)
-Quizzes, Classwork
PAC (5%)
-Preparedness, Attentiveness, Collaboration
Homework (5%)
          

Notebooks and homework assignments
You will keep a notebook containing class notes, outlines of your reading assignments, and analyses and summaries of primary and secondary sources.
Entries should be dated and neatly written or typed. Homework (in the form of reading, outlining the assigned pages, and analyzing or summarizing documents) is assigned regularly. You will have 2-3 such assignments per week.
Notebooks will be collected on test days. Notebook grades are based on neatness, organization, comprehensiveness of note-taking and satisfactory completion of assignments.

Academic honesty
Plagiarism and cheating are considered major violations of school rules. Students are expected to present work that is their own, and to cite references and sources when appropriate. Presenting another's work may result in dismissal. Incidents of plagiarism and cheating will be referred to the History Department Chair and the AHOS. Students will also receive a 0 for the assignment/quiz/test in question. Students may not work together on homework outlines or document analyses. On papers, when in doubt: CITE YOUR SOURCE. Of course, students may study for tests and quizzes together.

-->QUARTER 1
Unit 1
Medieval Christianity & Islam: The Crusades

Beck, ch.13 – Pages 350-373
Summary -- Sherman, pp. 140-141 (Le Goff)
Document Analysis -Letters: Secular and Ecclesiastical Authority (Sherman, pp. 130-
                                                                                                                                  131)
            Germanic Kingdoms
The Franks
Clovis, Clovis’s Conversion
The Carolingians
Roman Christian Europe: Charlemagne
The papacy: Roman Catholic vs. Eastern Orthodox, Gregory I
Monasticism, St. Benedict's Rule

AERO Standards and Performance:
Standard 4 (culture) & standard 5 (society and identity): Students will understand religious, cultural and intellectual developments and interactions among societies.
           
Essential Questions:
How essential is religion to early society?
Why do people live together and form societies?
How does someone’s cultural and religious influence understand the world?
To what degree does one individual have autonomy from their religion and culture?

Beck, ch.14, pages 376-381 & 387-403
Otto I of Saxony
Investiture Contest
Frederick Barbarossa
Capetian France
The Normans
Norman England
Italian States
Agricultural Techniques; New Tools Technologies; New Crops
Population Growth; Urbanization; Textile; Mediterranean Trade
The Hanseatic League
The Three Estates
Chivalry; Troubadours; Eleanor of Aquitaine; Guilds
Aristotle; Scholasticism; St. Thomas Aquinas

           AERO Standards and Performance:
           Standards 2 (connections and conflict), 4  (culture) & 5 (society and identity): Students will understand cultural, religious and intellectual developments and interactions among societies. Students will understand causes and effects of interactions among societies, including trade, systems of exchanges, war and diplomacy. Students will understand social systems and structures and how these influence the individual.

            Essential Questions:
            How does society organize itself? What is a social group? Analyze how trade has contributed to cooperation and conflict. Analyze how cooperation and conflict influence political, economic, and social conditions.

Beck, ch. 14, pages 382-386
Popular religion: sacraments, saints, relics, pilgrimage
Dominicans & Franciscans, heresy, Cathars
Atlantic & Baltic colonization
The Reconquest
The Crusades: Urban II, First & Fourth Crusades
Consequences of the Crusades
Beck, ch.10, pages 260-279
                       Summaries -- Sherman, pp. 79-82 (Watt-Lapidus-Hourani-Brown)
The Islamic world: new crops, economic growth, merchants & trade, banking
Changing status of women
Islamic culture: Quran, Sufis, Mecca, hajj
Other influences on Islam: Persia, India, Greece
Ibn Battuta

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standards 2 (connections and conflict), 4  (culture) & 5 (society and identity): Students will understand cultural, religious and intellectual developments and interactions among societies. Students will understand causes and effects of interactions among societies, including war and diplomacy. Students will understand social and religious systems and structures and how these influence the individual.

Essential Questions:
Examine how certain texts can be viewed as sacred. Evaluate religious characteristics (creed, code of behavior, rituals, community). To what degree can individuals differ with social and religious expectations? What are the rewards for doing so? What are the penalties?


Unit 2
The Renaissance World and the New Kingdoms

Beck, ch. 17, pp. 468-487
Document Analyses -- The City of Ladies & The Prince (Sherman, pp. 148-149)
State building: Hundred Years' War, Italian states, France & England, Spain
The Renaissance
Art: Masaccio, da Vinci, Donatello, Michaelangelo
Architecture: Brunelleschi
Humanism: Erasmus, Petrarca
Document Analyses (3) -- Merchants and Trade (Stearns, pp. 151-162) -- A Muslim view, a Christian view, and a Chinese view
Holy Roman Empire, Charles V, Habsburgs, Ottomans, Philip II
New monarchs: Henry VIII
Spain: Ferdinand & Isabella, the Inquisition

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 4 (culture): Analyze how art, literature, and traditional customs both shape and are shaped by society.

Essential Questions:
Why do cultures change? Is culture “real”? How does someone’s culture influence how they understand the world?

Unit 3
China and Mongolia

Beck, ch. 12, pp. 320-335
Tang & Song economic development: rice, new agricultural techniques
Hangzhou
Patriarchal social structures
Foot binding
Technological changes: porcelain, metallurgy, gunpowder, printing, naval economy Market economy, paper money
Buddhism, Daoism
Neo-Confucianism
Mings, Great Wall
Manchus, Qing dynasty, Kangxi
Son of Heaven
Examination system
Filial piety, gender relations, foot binding
Population growth, foreign trade

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standards 5 (society and identity), standard 6 (government) & standard 8 (science, technology, and society): Analyze the socialization of individuals by groups, organizations and institutions. Evaluate strengths and weakness of various kinds of political philosophies and ideologies. Examine historical and current influences of modern science on technological innovations. Examine how many cultures reflect and reinforce oppositional ideas of gender.

Essential Questions:
How does society organize itself? Do scientific developments and technological developments create new social, ethical, moral, religious, and legal issues or do they amplify existing social, ethical, moral, religious, and legal issues?

Chinggis Khan and the Mongol Empire
Khubilai Khan & China, Marco Polo, Yuan dynasty
Unsuccessful invasion of Japan
Golden Horde
Mongol rule in China
Trade, missionaries
End of Mongol rule in China & Persia

Recovery in China
Ming dynasty: Hongwu, mandarins & eunuchs
Zheng He's voyages

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 2 (connections and conflict) & standard 5 (society and identity): Analyze effects of conflict on national unity. Analyze how trade has contributed to cooperation and conflict. Analyze the socialization of individuals by groups, organizations, and institutions.

Essential Questions:
To what degree do formal protocols of trade, conflict, and conflict resolution control interactions between societies? How does society organize itself? What is a social group?

-->QUARTER 2
Unit 4
The Americas
Beck, ch.9, pages 232-246
Document Analysis -- Memoirs: The Aztecs (Sherman, pp.167-168)
Toltecs
Mexica
Tenochtitlan
Aztec Empire
Mexica society

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 1 (time, continuity, and change), standard 3 (geography) & standard 6 (government). Students will evaluate the impact of migration on the structure of societies. Students will understand the interactions and relationship between human societies and their physical environment. Students will understand why societies create and adopt systems of governance.

Essential Questions:
How does geography, climate, and natural resources affect the way people live and work? How does society organize itself? Why do civilizations and societies reveal long-term enduring patterns in culture, social structure, and governance?

Unit 5
Exploration and the Spread of Civilization

Beck, ch. 20, pages 550-571
Motives for exploration
Prince Henry the Navigator
Technology: ships & sails, astrolabe, compass
Dias, da Gama
Columbus
Magellan

Summaries: Sherman, pp. 193-197 (Fairbank & Teng, Lehmann, and Bush)
Trading post empires: Portuguese, English, Dutch
Conquest of the Philippines, Java
Seven Years' War
Columbian Exchange
Origins of global trade
Manila galleons
Document Analysis -- Cortes (Stearns, pp. 191-193)
Spanish Caribbean: Columbus, Hispaniola, encomenderos, Taino, smallpox
Conquest of Mexico & Peru: Cortes, Motecuzoma II, Pizarro, Atahualpa
Spanish empire, encomienda system, viceroys
Cabral & Portuguese Brazil
French & English colonies, conflict, Seven Years' War
Document Analysis -- Red, White, & Black: The Peoples of Early America (Sherman, pp. 175-177)
Multicultural societies: da Vaca, mestizos, creoles
Mining and agriculture: silver, hacienda
Sugar and slavery
Fur trade
Plantation system
Missionaries

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 2 (connections and conflicts), standard 4 (culture), standard 6 (government) & standard 7 (production, consumption and production). Students will understand causes and effects of interaction among societies, including trade, systems of international exchange, war, and diplomacy. Students will understand cultural and intellectual developments and interactions among societies. Students will understand why societies create and adopt systems of governance and how they address human needs, rights, responsibilities and citizenship. Students will understand how economies are shaped by geographic factors.

Essential Questions:
Why do societies trade? Why do they wage war? Why do people leave together and form societies? Why do cultures change? How does trade influence people’s lives?

Unit 6
Absolute Monarchs in Europe

Beck, ch. 21, pages 586-614
Document Analyses -- The Powers of the Monarch & The Powers of Parliament (Sherman, pp. 201-202)
English Civil War
French absolutism: Cardinal Richelieu, Louis XIV, Versailles
Peace of Westphalia, balance of power
Development of cannons
Early capitalist society
Joint-stock companies
Putting-out system
Peter the Great: reforms, St. Petersburg
Catherine II, enlightened despot, Pugachev's rebellion

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 2 (connections and conflicts), standard 6 (government) & standard 7 (production, consumption and production). Students will understand the roots of historical development of contemporary political systems. Students will understand causes and effects of interaction among societies, including trade, systems of international exchange, war, and diplomacy. Students will understand why societies create and adopt systems of governance and how they address human needs, rights, responsibilities and citizenship. Students will understand how economies are shaped by geographic factors.

Essential Questions:
Why do societies trade? Why do they wage war? How does trade influence people’s lives? Can an economy be both highly productive and genuinely fair in the distribution of goods and services? How are governments established, maintained, and changed? What happens in the absence of government?


Unit 7
Scientific Revolution & the Enlightenment

Beck, ch. 22, pages 620-636
Document Analyses -- Descartes, Newton (Sherman, vol 2, pp. 52-53)
Ptolemy, planetary movement
Copernicus
Kepler, Galileo
Newton
Document Analyses -- Kant (Sherman, vol 2, pp. 53-54) & Rousseau (Sherman, vol 2, pp. 56-57)
The Enlightenment
Locke, Montesquieu, Voltaire
Attitude toward religion
Philosophes
Theory of progress

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 8 (science, technology, and society). Student will understand how societies have influenced and been influenced by scientific developments and technological developments.

Essential Questions:
Do scientific developments and technological developments create new social, ethical, moral, religious, and legal issues or do they amplify existing social, ethical, moral, religious, and legal issues? Is contemporary life better or worse off because of modern scientific developments and because of modern technological developments?


END OF SEMESTER 1

-->QUARTER  3
Unit 8
The French and the American Revolutions

Beck, ch.22 pages 636-640 and ch.23, pages 648-672, ch. 24 pages 678-687
Sovereignty & divine right
John Locke, social contract
Philosophes: Voltaire
Rousseau
Enlightenment ideas
Seven Years' War
Tightened control of the British colonies
"No taxation without representation."
Declaration of Independence
Relative advantages
George Washington
Yorktown and the end of the war
U.S. Constitution
Sherman, maps & charts, pp. 73-75 (Read only)
Document Analysis -- The Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen (Sherman, pp. 65-66)
Ancien regime, three estates
Louis XVI, Versailles
Estates General
National Assembly
Storming the Bastille
Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen
National Convention, Robespierre, Jacobins
Execution of Louis XVI, guillotine
Committee of Public Safety
the Directory, coup d'etat
Summary: Sherman, pp. 76-78 (Lefebvre, Sutherland, & Doyle)
Summary: Sherman, pp. 78-80

Napoleon Bonaparte, Corsica
Concordat of 1801, Civil Code
Napoleon's rule
Invasion of Russia
Exile in Elba, Waterloo, and exile on St. Helena
Haitian Revolution: Saint-Domingue, gens de couleur, Toussaint, Haiti
Peninsulares, creoles
Mexico: Hidalgo
Bolivar, Gran Colombia
Brazilian independence, Pedro I

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 1 (time, continuity, and change), standard 2 (connections and conflicts) and standard 6 (government). Students will understand why societies create and adopt systems of governance and how they address human needs, rights, responsibilities and citizenship.

Essential Questions:
What roles do individuals play in historical change? What types of forces or events bring about genuine historical change, that is, which genuine disrupt patterns of continuity? How are governments established, maintained, and changed? What happens in the absence of government? 


Unit 9
Revolutions and Political Ideologies


Beck, ch.24, pages 687-697
Document Analysis -- Secret Memorandum to Tsar Alexander I, 1820 (Sherman, pp. 68-69)
Ideology
Conservatism, Burke
Liberalism, Mill
Slavery, Equiano
Anti-slavery movement: Wilberforce, abolition
Women's rights, Astell
Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women
Women and the French Revolution
Olympe de Gouges, The Declaration of the Rights of Woman and the Female Citizen (p. 829)
Women's rights movements; Stanton, Seneca Falls
Summary: Sherman, pp. 77-80 (Doyle & Smith)
Nation, nationalism
Herder, German Volk, Brothers Grimm
Mazzini, Young Italy
Zionism, Dreyfus, Herzl
Congress of Vienna, Metternich
Nationalist rebellions: Greece, 1848

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 1 (time, continuity, and change), standard 4 (culture), standard 5 (society and identity) and standard 6 (government). Students will understand patterns of change and continuity, relationships between people and events through time, and various interpretations of these relationships. Students will understand why societies create and adopt systems of governance and how they address human needs, rights, responsibilities and citizenship.

Essential Questions:
What roles do individuals play in historical change? What types of forces or events bring about genuine historical change, that is, which genuine disrupt patterns of continuity? How are governments established, maintained, and changed? What happens in the absence of government? How ideals and institutions of freedom, equality, justice and citizenship have changed over time and from one society to another? What is the impact of revolutions on politics, economies, and societies?

Exam # 2
Notebook Due

Unit 10
The Industrial Revolution & European Nationalism

Beck, ch.25, pages 714-734
Document Analysis -- Testimony for the Factory Act of 1833 (Sherman, pp.82-83)
Industrialization
Coal and colonies
British cotton textile industry
Mechanization: flying shuttle, mule, power loom
Watt's steam engine
Iron and steel production; coke; Bessemer process
Energy: Watt's steam engine
Railroads: Stephenson
Putting out system
The factory: working conditions, Luddites

Summary: Heilbroner (Sherman, pp. 95-96)
Spread of industrialization: Belgium, France, Germany, US
Mass production: Eli Whitney, interchangeable parts, Ford
Corporations, monopolies, Rockefeller, vertical & horizontal integration
Population growth, demographic transition, urbanization
Malthus on Population
Migration
Document Analysis -- The Communist Manifesto (Sherman, pp. 84-86)
New social classes, industrial families, domestic servants
Child labor
Utopian socialism: Fourier, Owen
Marx and Engles: Manifesto of the Communist Party (1848), dictatorship of the proletariat
Social reform, trade unions
Spread of industrialization: Russia (Witte), Japan (zaibatsu)
Demand for raw materials, economic development, economic dependency
Geographic division of labor
Document Analysis -- The Origin of Species and The Descent of Man (Sherman, pp 89-90)
Crimean War
Emancipation of the serfs, Alexander II
Zemstvos
Industrialization: Witte, trans-Siberian RR, discontent
Protest: anarchists, repression, pogroms, terrorism
Nicholas II, Russo-Japanese War, Revolution of 1905, Bloody Sunday, Duma

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 3 (geography), standard 7 (production, distribution, and consumption) and standard 8 (science, technology, and society). Students will evaluate the impact of migration on the structure of societies. Students will study historical change by applying fundamental economic concepts. Students will describe reciprocal influence of changes in transportation and communication and changes in trade and economic activities. Students will understand how societies have influenced and had been influenced by scientific developments and technological developments.

Essential Questions:
How does the movement of people, material goods, and ideas influence geography? To what extent do the laws of supply and demand shape economic activity? Why do people trade and how trade influence people’s lives? Do scientific, developments and technological developments create new social, ethical, moral, religious, and legal issues or do they amplify existing social, ethical, moral, religious, and legal issues?

-->QUARTER 4

Unit 11
The Age of Imperialism

Beck, ch.27, pages 770-796
Document Analysis -- The White Man's Burden (Sherman, pp. 143-144)
Rhodes, "Cape to Cairo"
Imperialism, colonialism, political motives, cultural justification
Rudyard Kipling, white man's burden
Steamships, Suez & Panama Canals, RRs, weapons, telegraph
Document Analysis – The Age of Empires – The Scramble of Africa (Sherman, pp. 152-154)
Scramble for Africa
Livingstone, Stanley, Leopold II, Congo Free State
Egypt, Muhammad Ali, Suez Canal
Lugard Justifies Imperialism
South Africa: Boers, Great Trek, Boer War
Berlin Conference
Ethiopia, Liberia
direct & indirect rule
Document Analysis -- Japan, Reject the Westerners (Sherman, pp. 132-135)
Opium War
Letter of Lin Zexu to Queen Victoria
Unequal treaties, Treaty of Nanjing (1842), Hong Kong
Taiping Rebellion: Hong Xiuquan, Qing dynasty
Self-Strengthening Movement, Cixi
Spheres of influence
Hundred Days reforms, Boxer Rebellion
Tokugawa bakufu
US fleet, Matthew Perry
Meiji Restoration; foreign influences
Abolition of the feudal order
Alliance w/ Britain, Sino-Japanese & Russo-Japanese Wars

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 2 (connections and conflict) and standard 6 (government). Students will evaluate the efforts to resolve conflict within and among nations. Students will analyze the effects of conflict on national unity.

Essential Questions:
Why do societies wage war? To what degree do formal protocols of trade, conflict, and conflict resolution control interactions between societies? What constrains national governments when shaping domestic policy and directing foreign policy? How are governments established, maintained, and changed?
Unit 12
World War I
Beck, ch. 29, pages 841-858
Self-determination
National rivalries
Alliance system: Central Powers vs. Allies
Schieffen Plan
Balkan powder keg; assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand
Serbia, ultimatum, mobilization
Invasion of Belgium

Deadlock: trench warfare, new weapons, gas
Eastern front
Verdun
The home front: total war, women at war, right to vote, propaganda
World War: East Asia, Africa, Gallipoli, Lawrence of Arabia
Document Analysis -- The Fourteen Points (Sherman, pp. 159-161)
Russian Revolution, February Revolution, soviets, provisional government, Lenin
Petrograd soviet
October Revolution
Treaty of Brest-Litovsk
US intervention: Wilson, unlimited submarine warfare, Lusitania
Effects of the blockades: Easter Rebellion
Paris Peace Conference: Wilson's 14 Points; Lloyd George, Clemenceau Versailles Treaty (map p. 996)
League of Nations, self-determination, reparations, resentment
Weakened Europe

Stearns, ch. 20, pp. 289-299 -- Essay (Question 3)

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 2 (connections and conflict). Students will understand causes and effects of interaction among societies including war and diplomacy. Students will analyze the causes and effects of alliances and multinational organizations. Students will analyze how cooperation and conflict influence political, economic, and social conditions. Students will evaluate efforts to resolve conflict within and among nations. Students will evaluate the effect of conflict on national unity?

Essential Questions:
Why do societies wage war? To what degree do formal protocols of conflict, and conflict resolution control interactions between societies? Why, in modern society, it is even harder to determine who a society’s enemies or allies are?

Unit 13
The Rise of Dictatorships and WWII
Beck, ch.30, pages 864-874
Document Analysis -- April Theses: The Bolshevik Strategy (Sherman, pp.161)

Civil War: Communists, Reds vs Whites, foreign intervention, war communism
Lenin: NEP
Politburo, USSR, Stalin
Five Year Plans; collectivization, kulaks
Life in Soviet society
The Great Purge; cleansing
Beck, ch. 31, pages 894-915
Postwar pessimism: lost generation, Hemingway, disillusionment, Remarque, Spengler
Religious uncertainty, attacks on progress
Revolutions in physics & psychology: Einstein, relativity, Freud
Modern art & architecture: Gauguin, Picasso, Bauhaus
Great Depression: reparations, overproduction, Great Crash
Economic nationalism, personal suffering
Beck, ch. 32, pages 922-948
Document Analysis -- The Doctrine of Fascism (Sherman, pp. 161-163)
Fascism
Mussolini, Il Duce
Hitler, Nazi Party, reich, racist ideology and racist policy
Mein Kampf
Eugenics
Anti-Semitism: Nuremburg Laws, Kristallnacht, pogrom
 
Origins of World War II: Axis vs Allies
Japanese aggression: invasion of Manchuria, Rape of Nanjing
Italian invasion of Ethiopia, Spanish Civil War
Hitler: Anschluss, Sudetenland, Munich Conference, Chamberlain
Russian-German Treaty of Nonaggression

President Franklin Roosevelt
Invasion of Poland, blitzkrieg, u-boats, fall of France, Battle of Britain
Barbarossa, Stalingrad
Pearl Harbor, "Asia for Asians"
Allied victory in Europe, D-Day
Midway, Magic
Hiroshima & Nagasaki

Summary -- Goldhagen (Sherman, pp. 179-180)

Occupation, collaboration, and resistance
Atrocities: Lidice
The Holocaust: the Final Solution, Auschwitz, Warsaw
Women and the war

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 2 (connection and conflict), standard 5 (society and identity), and standard 6 (government). Students will understand causes and infects of interaction among societies, including war and diplomacy. Students will evaluate efforts to resolve conflict within and among nations. Students will also look at the effectiveness of international organizations. Students will understand social systems and structures and these influence individual. Students will understand why societies create and adopt systems of governance.

Essential Questions:
Are democratic governments and those based upon constitutions, civic rights and responsibilities, and the rule of law universally the “best” form of government? What happens in the absence of government? Why do societies wage war?
Unit 14
The Postwar World
Beck, ch.33, pages 963-988
Document Analysis -- Sherman, pp. 200-201
Cold War
Truman
Yalta and Potsdam
Occupation of Germany, Korea
Truman Doctrine: Greece and Turkey, containment
Marshall Plan, NATO, Warsaw Pact
United Nations
Divided Germany, Berlin Airlift, West and East Germany, Berlin Wall
Korean War, Eisenhower
Castro, Bay of Pigs, Cuban Missile Crisis
Female liberation, McCarthy, civil rights, King
Khrushchev, space race, Sputnik, peaceful coexistence
DeGaulle, Tito, deStalinization, Hungary, Prague Spring, Brezhnev

Unit 15
Struggles for Democracy
Beck, ch.35, pages 1030-1064
Chinese Civil War: Mao, Jiang, People's Republic of China, Taiwan
Vietnam, Afghanistan, Dr. Strangelove
End of the Cold War
Gorbachev, velvet revolution, Solidarity
Perestroika and glasnost, Yeltsin

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 1 (time, continuity and change), standard 5 (society and identity), and standard 6 (government). Students will analyze the impact of revolution on politics, economies, and societies. Students will analyze how ideals and institutions of freedom, equality, justice, and citizenship have changed over time and from one society to another. Students will evaluate strengths and weaknesses of various kinds of political philosophies and ideologies (capitalism vs. socialism/communism).

Essential Questions:
Which types of forces or events bring about genuine change, that is, which genuinely disrupt patterns of continuity?  What constrains national governments when shaping domestic policy and directing foreign policy?

Unit 16
Global Interdependence

Beck, ch.36, pages 1068-1082
Economic Globalization
Free Trade
GATT and WTO
The Economy of Japan and China
Japan-The Little Tigers-The Rise of China
European Union
Trading Blocs: OPEC – NAFTA

Environment
Population Control
HIV/AIDS
Defining Terrorism
September 11th 2001
War in Afghanistan and Iraq
Feminism and Equal Rights
Gender Equality in China

AERO Standards and Performance Indicators:
Standard 7 (production, distribution, and consumption). Students will understand fundamental economic principles and ways in which economies are shaped by geographic and human factors.

Essential Questions:
What are the major economic systems? What are the changes in trade and economic activities? Why are all humans’ economic needs not met or satisfied? Can an economy be both highly productive and genuinely fair in distribution of goods and services?

Review - Final Exam
End of the Year